Nursing (RN to BSN)

Bachelor of science in nursing University of Missouri-Kansas City
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Overview

Our RN-BSN program is designed for working registered nurses who hold an Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN). Students must have an unencumbered registered nursing license to qualify for this program. Expand your leadership skills, transitional care knowledge,  and your career opportunities by adding a Bachelor of Science in Nursing to your Registered Nurse licensure. The RN-BSN program at the UMKC School of Nursing and Health Studies is a nationally recognized fully online degree that stands out for its use of technology, faculty engagement, excellent student outcomes,  student satisfaction, and excellent preparation for the MSN, DNP and/or PhD studies. 

One feature that sets the UMKC RN-BSN program apart from other completion programs is the integration of rural, urban and suburban nurses coming together to explore issues relevant to health care and the nursing profession. The program is designed to hone the professional development of RNs to become leaders, managers, coordinators, advocates and designers of care. During the final year of the RN-BSN curriculum, student teams work collaboratively with RN-BSN supervisory practice experience faculty, health care organizations or health care-related entities to design and implement team-directed practice experiences. The process is created to empower you to assume a leadership role in improving health care.

Quick facts

Official name

Bachelor of science in nursing

Campus

University of Missouri-Kansas City

Program type

Bachelor's degree

Academic home

School of Nursing and Health Studies

Delivery mode

Blended, some campus visits required

Accreditation

Higher Learning Commission, Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education

Credit hours

42

Estimated cost

$19,143.00

*This cost is for illustrative purposes only. Your hours and costs will differ, depending on your transfer hours, your course choices and your academic progress. See more about tuition and financial aid.

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Career prospects

The program is designed to hone the professional development of RNs to become leaders, managers, coordinators, advocates and designers of care. Graduates may continue to work as expert RNs in any health care area, as nurse administrators or leaders and pursue graduate degrees.

Burning Glass Technologies. 2021. Salary numbers and employment growth numbers are based on models that consider advertised job posting salary, Bureau of Labor Statistics data and other proprietary and public sources of information for multiple occupations.
12.85%
employment growth
Burning Glass Technologies. 2021. Salary numbers and employment growth numbers are based on models that consider advertised job posting salary, Bureau of Labor Statistics data and other proprietary and public sources of information for multiple occupations.
$67,000
median salary

Program structure

Delivery of this program is 100% online: no campus visits are required. Courses are semester-based. Students typically take one or two courses each semester and finish in two to three years.

Course work includes

  • Tools for personal effectiveness
  • Health assessment
  • Tools for interpersonal effectiveness
  • Effectiveness in human health outcomes
  • Application to practice

Delivery

Blended, some campus visits required

Calendar system

Semester

Typical program length

2-3 years

Typical course load

1-2 courses per semester

Accreditation

The University of Missouri-Kansas City is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, one of six regional institutional accreditors in the United States.

The RN to BSN at the School of Nursing and Health Studies is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

Faculty spotlight

Anita Skarbek.

Dr. Skarbek is the RN-BSN program director and also teaches in the program. She was instrumental in having the RN-BSN program receive two major HRSA nursing workforce diversity grants totaling $1.75 million (2010) and $350,000 (2016) targeted at rural and underserved RN-BSN students. Her research focuses on issues involving disruptive behavior in nursing practice, and how this behavior impacts the safety and quality of patient care delivery, RN recruitment and retention efforts, as well as nursing's professional and social advancement. She loves teaching and helping students achieve their academic and career goals.

Anita Skarbek, PhD
RN-BSN Program Director and Clinical Assistant Professor

Learn more about this program

This program is administered by the School of Nursing and Health Studies