Information science and learning technologies

Doctor of philosophy University of Missouri
Professor standing in front of a lecture hall holding a tablet.
Loading...
Mizzou

Get started with Mizzou

Apply

What are the best ways for users to find and use information? How does technology fuel learning? If you want to find answers to these questions through research at the intersection of technology, information, and human learning, this 100% online program is right for you. 

The University of Missouri online doctor of philosophy (PhD) in information science and learning technologies prepares students to understand and influence learning, information discovery and use, and performance in diverse settings, especially through the use of interactive technologies. The PhD program is designed for individuals who are committed to conducting research that integrates theory and practice. 

Faculty in the School of Information Science and Learning Technologies (SISLT), the iSchool at the University of Missouri (an AAU Research I university), have been teaching online for 20 years — and studying how people teach best online. SISLT faculty are well-equipped to deliver a quality learning experience that highlights one-on-one interactions between faculty and students. The online PhD features interdisciplinary course work that allows students to learn from experts in their field—and meet their own career goals.

As a student, you will gain the competencies required to:

  • Analyze specific informational organization and retrieval, learning and performance needs, and evaluate systems to meet these needs.
  • Design, develop, and implement technologies and technological interventions to improve information organization and retrieval, learning and performance.
  • Conduct systematic research, which contributes to the knowledge base of learning, information organization and retrieval, performance and/or technology.

The School of Information Science and Learning Technologies (SISLT) is a proud member of the iSchools consortium, an international coalition of leading information schools.

Quick facts

Official name

Doctor of philosophy in information science and learning technologies

Campus

University of Missouri

Program type

Doctorate

Academic home

College of Education & Human Development | School of Information Science and Learning Technologies

Delivery mode

100% online

Accreditation

Higher Learning Commission

Non-Related Master's to PhD credit hours

72

Non-Related Master's to PhD estimated cost

$35,028.00

Related Master's to PhD credit hours

42

Related Master's to PhD estimated cost

$20,433.00

*This cost is for illustrative purposes only. Your hours and costs will differ, depending on your transfer hours, your course choices and your academic progress. See more about tuition and financial aid.

Professor lecturing to a class with students grouped at tables.

Career prospects

Job titles graduates of this program may achieve:

  • Assistant professor
  • Researcher
  • Think tank researcher
  • University librarian
  • Director of campus technologies

The completion of the program will prepare students for career tracks in higher education, public policy, public and private research in various fields, including but not limited to interaction design, instructional design, and library and information science.

Burning Glass Technologies. 2021. Salary numbers and employment growth numbers are based on models that consider advertised job posting salary, Bureau of Labor Statistics data and other proprietary and public sources of information for multiple occupations.
11.87%
Employment growth
Burning Glass Technologies. 2021. Salary numbers and employment growth numbers are based on models that consider advertised job posting salary, Bureau of Labor Statistics data and other proprietary and public sources of information for multiple occupations.
$109,000
Median salary

Program structure

Delivery of this program is 100% online: No campus visits required. 

Courses are semester-based. Full-time students typically take three classes each semester and finish the program in 3 to 4 years. Part-time students take 1 or 2 classes each semester and finish in four to five years.

Interest areas include:

  • Engineering education
  • Educational gaming and simulation
  • Information organization, access and dissemination
  • Information seeking and use
  • Interactive learning environments including VR, embodied and augmented learning
  • Learner-centered design, interface design, instructional design
  • Libraries, archives, museums and other cultural heritage institutions
  • Reading, gaming and other immersive experiences
  • User experience (UX) and human computer interaction (HCI)

Delivery

100% online

Calendar system

Semester-based

Typical program length

3-4 years (full-time), 4-5 years (part-time)

Typical course load

3 classes per semester (full-time), 1-2 classes per semester (part-time)

Accreditation

The University of Missouri is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, one of six regional institutional accreditors in the United States.

Faculty spotlight

Contact for doctoral program in information science and technology

Dr. Heather Moulaison-Sandy has been with the iSchool since 2011. Her research focuses on organization of information and digital libraries, especially in scholarly communication. Dr. Moulaison-Sandy teaches primarily in library and information science.

Heather Moulaison-Sandy, PhD
Associate Professor, Director of Graduate Studies
Joi Moore, PhD

In addition to her role as a dean in the College of Education and professor of library science, Dr. Moore serves as a faculty member in the MU Institute for Data Science and as an affiliated faculty member in the Black Studies department. Her experience encompasses the human-centered and usability design of performance support technology and online instructional environments. 

 

Joi Moore, PhD
Associate Dean for Engagement & Outreach, Professor
Xinhao Xu

Dr. Xu’s research interests focus on embodied interactions and learning, immersive virtual learning environments and game-based learning for STEM subjects. Utilizing both quantitative and qualitative methods, he has been actively conducting research on learning and training in technology-enhanced environments to pursue answers to the umbrella research question of how to use technology to help people learn.

Xinhao Xu, PhD
Assistant Professor

Learn more about this program

This program is administered by the School of Information Science and Learning Technologies